<%=Keywords%> New energy sector eyeing development
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New energy sector eyeing development
As a new carbon tax sets China''s aviation industry fidgeting over projected losses, Fu Pengcheng, a Chinese biofuel expert, is feeling the pressure.
Fu''s office at the China University of Petroleum is developing new biological fuels. China''s major airlines are now looking to his research to trim their flights'' carbon emissions.
"We don''t have much time. A locally-developed biofuel is desperately needed to protect our aviation industry and China''s national interest," said Fu.
An advanced new energy sector would not just benefit the environment but also protect China against unfair attacks from foreign countries, said Fu.
Fu was referring to an EU plan to levy carbon emission taxes on flights departing or landing in the region starting next year. Airlines whose emissions exceed a set quota will be forced to buy extra credits from less prolific polluters in the industry.
Both China and the United States have expressed their disapproval, accusing the rule of being motivated by unilateralism and protectionism. Chinese airline operators complained that the unfair charge would cost them an additional 122 million dollars per year.
As a contingency plan against the worst-case scenario, Chinese airlines have launched reforms in the flight service to limit the carbon emissions yet having only achieved a modest effect.
"The kerosene, used commonly as fuel for aircraft accounts for 90 percent of the carbon emission of the fleet, prompting many countries to develop biofuel as a substitute," said Fu.
As a new carbon tax sets China''s aviation industry fidgeting over projected losses, Fu Pengcheng, a Chinese biofuel expert, is feeling the pressure.
Fu''s office at the China University of Petroleum is developing new biological fuels. China''s major airlines are now looking to his research to trim their flights'' carbon emissions.
"We don''t have much time. A locally-developed biofuel is desperately needed to protect our aviation industry and China''s national interest," said Fu.
An advanced new energy sector would not just benefit the environment but also protect China against unfair attacks from foreign countries, said Fu.
Fu was referring to an EU plan to levy carbon emission taxes on flights departing or landing in the region starting next year. Airlines whose emissions exceed a set quota will be forced to buy extra credits from less prolific polluters in the industry.
Both China and the United States have expressed their disapproval, accusing the rule of being motivated by unilateralism and protectionism. Chinese airline operators complained that the unfair charge would cost them an additional 122 million dollars per year.
As a contingency plan against the worst-case scenario, Chinese airlines have launched reforms in the flight service to limit the carbon emissions yet having only achieved a modest effect.
"The kerosene, used commonly as fuel for aircraft accounts for 90 percent of the carbon emission of the fleet, prompting many countries to develop biofuel as a substitute," said Fu.
 
(Source from China Daily)